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Open Monday to Saturday

Gallery Hours:
11 AM – 4 PM
The Gallery Café:
11 AM – 3 PM

76 Fairford St.W.
Moose Jaw, SK S6H 1V1

T 306.693.7600
TF 866.693.7600

Creating this Website

Creating this website felt like creating a work of art – and that is exactly what we feel this website has become as we share the stories of Yvette Moore, her family and all the artisans we showcase in our incredible historical building. Take your time as you browse through all the pages and especially the videos of 11 of our artisans as they welcome us all into their studios and display the passion of what makes them create their works, tell their stories. With the support of Tourism Saskatchewan, we feel that we have accomplished what we were striving for – to educate our viewers about the creative space that our artisans live and breath in as they passionately hand make their works of art.

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AUGUST – A TIME FOR HARVEST

“In August hot weather brings on harvest fast.  You can smell the wheat ripening.  Farmers work day and night to get their crops off, all the while keeping an eye on the sky for “the big White Combine” – hail clouds.  A field hit by hailstones looks like a herd of elephants has stampeded through it.  All the hard work can be wiped out in minutes.”

– Jo Bannatyne-Cugnet

This painting is one of 12 paintings reproduced in “A Prairie Year” – a children’s book written by Jo Bannatyne-Cugnet and published by Tundra Books.

Acrylic on Canvas     1994

Canvas Size    H 24″ x W 30″

SOLD

 

Send an Inquiry

The selection and price of each piece can vary as they are ever-changing.

Please call (306) 693-7600 or text (306) 527-7257 for a virtual catalogue of current options and availability.

Description

Every August, Sarah spent time at Grandma and Grandpa’s farm to help out Grandma prepare meals to bring out to fields and whenever she could, she would stay behind to keep Grandpa company in the combine.  Her favourite part of this adventure was when Grandpa would test the wheat by first rolling the head (or spike) of wheat between the palms of his hands and then blow away the chaff.  He would then pop out the kernel and bite down on it.  If it cracked, it meant it was dry and ready to harvest.

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